Back Technology Friday, January 21, 2022
Search Sections 21 Jan
Close
Advertisement
1h 32m Can this app help to keep women safe on the streets?
BBC
A new safety app has been developed by a team of volunteers with experience of abuse and violence.
 Like Reply

Comments

No comments yet...
Currencies in GBP
EUR 0,90 +0,335%
USD 0,77 +0,784%
CHF 0,78 +0,385%
5h ‘I was just really scared’: Apple AirTags lead to stalking complaints
The Guardian
Police across the US have received reports of devices intended to help locate lost items being used for nefarious purposes In early January, Brooks Nader, a 26-year-old Sports Illustrated swimsuit model, was walking home alone from a night out in New York when she received a disturbing iPhone notification telling her she was carrying an “unknown accessory”. “This item has been moving with you for a while,” the alert read. “The owner can see its location.”
 Like Reply
6h Elon Musk’s brain chip startup prepares for first ever human trials
The Independent
Neuralink job posting offers candidate ‘an opportunity to change the world’
 Like Reply
8h Updated BT to introduce inflation-busting price rises
BBC
Most broadband and phone bills will rise by more than 9% at the end of March, BT says.
 Like Reply
9h Wordle developer donates in-app spend to charity
BBC
The developer of a game with the same name as viral hit Wordle gives away the money spent on it.
 Like Reply
12h Brain device records activity in record-breaking detail
The Independent
Research could lead to breakthroughs in the emerging field of brain-computer interfaces
 Like Reply
15h Microsoft launches Chromebook rival with specialised software for schools
The Independent
The low-cost devices will come with Windows 11 SE, set up to take on Google’s Chrome OS
 Like Reply
15h Facebook’s second life: the unstoppable rise of the tech company in Africa
The Guardian
Western users may be logging off, but across the continent of Africa, the social media company is indispensable for everything from running a business to sourcing vaccines. How has it become so inescapable? Badri Ibrahim is a Sudanese comic artist and the founder of the Abbas Comics empire. His strips are quirky and irreverent, poking fun at the Sudanese military and encouraging civic activism. One recurrent character is a hapless but wise cat called Ghadanfar, a sort of Garfield meets Snoopy protagonist, who finds himself on the wrong end of misunderstandings with neighbourhood felines and humans. It is all rendered in colloquial dialect and is dry, funny and often poignant. So popular has the comic become that Ibrahim is regularly commissioned to do private work, rendering Ghadanfar in different guises – as a bashful groom on a wedding invitation card, for example. The majority of this work comes through Facebook, where his comics have about 19,000 followers. “I ran the page for about a year,” Ibrahim says. By then, it had become its own
 Like Reply
17h Updated Student accidentally becomes a millionaire after turning selfies into NFT as a joke
The Independent
‘I was thinking it might be funny if one of the collectors collected my face,’ 22-year-old says
 Like Reply
19h Microsoft’s Activision merger faces real-world barriers to metaverse mission
The Guardian
Suspicious US regulators and a problematic culture at the video game firm need to be overcome to realise AR vision If the world of
 Like Reply
25h Apple AirTags - "A perfect tool for stalking"
BBC
Apple’s AirTags are great for finding lost items. But they have a darker side.
 Like Reply
On the top

Date settings

Today is Thursday, January 20, 2022

+ 1 -
+ 1 -
+ 2016 -

Close

By using our website, you agree to the use of cookies as described in our cookie policy.

Accept